Tuesday, July 08, 2008

A house built on sand

The Korea Times yesterday published an article titled "Christians Denounce TV Program for Humanizing Jesus"
A television documentary depicting Jesus as a human is drawing sharp criticism from Christian circles. While Christian leaders have called for the cancellation of the program, the TV network's union has vowed to continue the broadcast.

The Christian Council of Korea (CCK), a group of protestant Christians, recently sent a complaint to SBS who aired the first episode of a four-part documentary "Shineui Gil, Inganeui Gil" (The Road of God, the Road of Man) on June 29.

The CCK said: "What the program is trying to say could shake many people's beliefs. It is a violation of individuals rights to have freedom of religion guaranteed by the Constitution." The group reportedly tried to cancel the show.

The CCK started a hunger strike but halted it several hours later Sunday. The Korean Association of Church Communication said, "We are very anxious that the program is trying to tarnish the honor of Jesus, who is the God of 2 billion people worldwide. We will do whatever we can to stop the devious program."
One more time:
It is a violation of individuals rights to have freedom of religion guaranteed by the Constitution."
Constitution law scholars each and every one of them. I missed the part where SBS was stopping them from believing whatever they wanted. It's this sentence which really got my attention:
"What the program is trying to say could shake many people's beliefs."
How weak must the foundation of these people's beliefs be if they can be shaken by a documentary?

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I understand what CCK was trying to do. But they should also understand Jesus was indeed human. And he was the Son of God and God Himself.

Every word of the Bible is not to be taken literally. Some words, yes, but not others because Bible is written by men. There are words of God but only in declarations (prophecies) or conversations. The rest, like history and letters are men's.

I wonder if the documentary is about Christianity itself, like how it started and what's the significance, then CCK shouldn't take offense. Or if the documentary is about Jesus himself in speculation by others rather than as facts, then it's okay as long as they disclaim that they are theoretical or opinions.

I don't think the article is clear on what it is about. It's too narrow and it's not painting a big picture. So I'm having a hard time understanding it.

Otto Silver said...

I can't help but quote it again:

"It is a violation of individuals rights to have freedom of religion guaranteed by the Constitution."

What?!

State says: "Oh, that's no problem at all. We won't violate your individual rights any more. From now on Buddhism is the only religion allowed in Korea. Hope you don't mind to much."

ZenKimchi said...

Unitarians are Christians and they don't believe in the divinity of Jesus. What about their beliefs?

Horace Jeffery Hodges said...

Obviously, the Eunuchtarians have cut the Father and the Son utterly off, leaving solely the emasculated Holey Spirit, and can hardly be called 'Christian', Mr. Zen Kimchi (or is it Ken Zimchi -- yes, I know your real name, you pseudo-Southerner!), so your entire comment is a red herring, delectible when grilled and served with a chilled glass of Johannesburg Riesling, by the way, you detestable heretic . . . and I say that in true Christian humility.

By the way, are you planning to partake in the Watts-on-Tap "Expat Living" bacchanal two weeks from Saturday? Hope to see you there, you scoundrel!

Jeffery Hodges

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ZenKimchi said...

You're right. They're not really the current breed of mega-dogmatic hate-filled fundamentalist Christians.

But hey, I was reachin'.

And, yes, planning to bring my fake Southern self to Watts. I hope to see you there.